Tag: Designers

15 Feb 2019
Product to Market No Money or Experience

How to Get a Product to Market Without Money or Experience?

The answer is time, a lot of time. There are three resources to any project. Money, Experience (Skills), and Time. At least one of these has to exist in a large quantity to overcome a lacking by any of the other two. The most successful products have at least 2 of these in a good amount, but there are also plenty of products that are created using only one resource to start.
 
So what do you do if you don’t have money or experience, but you are willing to take the time to create your product? Well, here’s the formula.
 
First, you’ll need skills and experience. This can either come from a co-founder or by you learning those skills yourself. You might ask, “why don’t you just go get funding first and spend time on that”? Well, it’s because almost no one buys, invests, or steals just ideas. They aren’t valuable enough. You have to create value before someone will invest capital. The best way to do that is to create a working prototype of your product, whether that’s an app, a mechanical product, or an electronics design. To do that, you need the skills and experience to create that prototype, a co-founder/partner who has the skills, or the money to pay someone else to do it. Finding a co-founder that’s willing to jump in at the very beginning is like finding a needle in a haystack. Possible, and we all cheer for the one who does it, but most people don’t find the perfect person to help them right at the beginning.
 
Getting a prototype that would be convincing enough to get funding has, in my experience, cost anywhere from $10,000 all the way up to $50,000 on average. Plus you might want to get a patent in there too. If you don’t have that kind of budget, then you’ll need to build your own prototype, which will still cost some money, and create a proof of concept.
 
Once you have that prototype, which could take you years instead of months to create by yourself, then you’ll be ready to start spending your time getting investments to move the product forward. There is no way to bring a product to market without cash from somewhere, even if you have a great idea. That money will go to marketing, sales, and production. While you could try to get a larger company to pick up your idea, keep in mind that they have teams of people coming up with ideas with huge R&D budgets.
 
If you want success, your best bet is to create a prototype, get funding, and launch a company. It’s much easier to sell a successful product and company than to get someone to buy a product that has no proven market. Not that it can’t happen, because it definitely does, but the chance of success is not as high. Some people will tell you that luck is a part of this, I’d disagree. Be persistent and enjoy the journey. Even if it takes years of working on it as you have time and money to do so, stick with it. Your idea is important as long as you enjoy it. Happy inventing! 

06 Nov 2017
Peterman Design Firm Concept vs Design Blog

Concept vs Design

When talking to a designer, it helps to be able to speak the same language. The two terms that have caused the most confusion between clients and their designers are concept and design. There could be a lengthy argument for when each word should be used, or even that they are interchangeable. However, defining a word’s meaning can help make sure the right conversation is had.
To put it simply; a concept is a starting point, or an idea.  Concepts come in many different forms including 3D models, sketches, renders, verbal or written descriptions, a scribble, a single sentence, models, or animations. The range of options we have at our disposal to convey concepts are vast. Concepts do not have to exist in reality, they can push the envelope of reality and go places we can’t yet.
Designs are concepts that have developed blueprints and fully defined instructions. A good example from the gaming world would be that the description of a game is the concept, the code that makes the game work is its blueprint, and the game experience is the design. This doesn’t mean that a design is final. Most designs go through revisions and changes, but no descent design remains vague.  A good design is complete enough that every detail has been accounted for and exists in a measurable and definable way. Designs are rooted in the here and now, they follow current technologies and our understanding of physics. There are always “blue-sky projects” the leading edge of design that follows our craziest concepts and pushes us forward, but the majority of design sits comfortably in the achievable realm.
At the Peterman Design Firm we follow this: a concept is any idea not ready for production and a design is one that is. We, along with many designers, work through the entire process, concept to production. In order to go to production, you need a design, in order to create a design, you need a concept, in order to create a concept, you need an idea. We facilitate concepts, designs, and every step in between.

27 Oct 2017

3 Things You Need Before Hiring a Designer

I’ve been working with clients for over a decade, and I’ve found that there are three things I’m always asking for. Every Industrial Designer would love you to have ready for them before talking to them about your project.
1. Have a budget. I know, a lot of people new to product design don’t know what a reasonable budget is, and I get a lot of potential clients asking ‘how much does this cost’? Well, there is no simple answer. The amount of money you put in is directly associated with what you get out of it, to a certain point. I can spend 30 hours and get a quick product design done, I’ve done it, and a lot of other designers have too, or I can spend 120 hours and have an amazing design solution that everyone loves. If I asked a room of people, many would go for the cheapest design possible, but is that what you really want? The average product design, start to finish, is an 80-200 hour process depending on the product. And no, that doesn’t include vehicle sized products. Average hourly rates range from $80-$250 an hour depending on how much experience the designer has, the industry, and if it’s an agency. Keep in mind, top agencies run more around $500-$1000 an hour. As a design firm, we like to work on a by project rate as it keeps things simple and up front for our clients. An average project is about $10,000 for a full design, concept to manufacturing packet. So be upfront about what you expect in price, and timeline. If it’s unreasonable, we’ll tell you.
2. Know your why. So, you have a great product idea, or even redesigning a product. But why? Why are you creating this product, what problem does it solve, how does it help people? If your first answer is ‘because I’d use it’, then we should do some market research to make sure . Working with start-ups and entrepreneurs a lot, I’ve come across some amazing ideas that almost no one would use. Knowing your why helps us to tell your story through the product. People get behind products that have a great story and makes their life easier.
3. Know your market. We’ll do some market research at the start of the project, unless you come to a designer with a full market strategy, SWOT analysis, and information on the competitions products. But whether we do it or you do it, you should at least have a basic understanding of who you are marketing the product to. It guides us if we do the research, and it helps us with the design of the product. You might have an awesome product idea, but maybe it works for two very different markets, like babies and seniors! (look at diapers, both age groups use it, but the product is designed very differently for each market) Knowing who we are designing for, their budget, lifestyle, and age to name a few metrics, helps us create a product they will use, and you can sell successfully.
 
Some of you might notice that I didn’t say have an idea anywhere in there. While most people think that they need to have a product idea already before they talk to a designer, that isn’t the case with great designers. When looking at a product idea, what we really look at is the problem it is solving. We design to solve the problem, fixing a pain point in someone’s life. Maybe that pain point is not hearing the best audio possible, or maybe it’s not wanting to cobble together your own product, or maybe it’s a problem you see frequently for people you interact with. Industrial Design is about solving problems, and we’re happy to work with you whether you have a product idea, or just want to solve a problem but don’t have any idea how to.

Connect with us to turn your idea into reality.